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Old September 9th, 2004, 07:07 AM   #1
Nick
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What should I look out for in a good body filler. I remember there's a certain ingredient I should look for to make sure it's not in there. Any good places to buy from? Thanks in advance, and [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/fingerclear.gif[/img] fro the rest [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img]
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Old September 9th, 2004, 07:25 AM   #2
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I think the "magic" ingredient you want to avoid is TALC, because it causes water absorbsion, and as we all know water leads to rust. I have had great sucess with the entire EVERCOAT product line [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img] . Their filler Rage Gold is great, easy to mix and apply, very easy to sand and won't clog the sand paper. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/bowdown.gif[/img] I suggest you go to your local Body shop supply store and buy stuff there, those people and their customers make their living off auto body repair and know whats good and works and whats not and doesn't. There may even be better stuff out there than the EVERCOAT, but what ever you decide to go with try to stay within a manufacturers product line for everything. They will have gone to the trouble to make sure their stuff is all compatible, and you won't get any nasty surprizes. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/eek1.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/crybaby.gif[/img] [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/yelling.gif[/img]
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Old September 9th, 2004, 07:29 AM   #3
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the shop i worked at as a teenager used tiger hair filler i don't know if they even make the stuff anymore long time passed but they loved it [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img] . my brother uses RAGE he swears by it, got the ingrediants in it to make it withstand long sanding periods without turning loose (withstand heat generated by hard sanding) also the adhesion mechanics are better.................call your local "reputable" body shop, napa deals in some good products..........getting close to needing filler myself gonna go with rage its a little costly but well worth it..................
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Old September 9th, 2004, 08:04 AM   #4
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The water absorption shouldnt be an issue for most repairs. If you are filling over welds or some pin holes then the yes it would be an issue. Rust hole should never be filled over if you want a lasting repair. With that being said if it is an area where one might have a pin hole such as in a weld that water might get to the back side I would recomend the fiberglass reinforsed filler as it is water proof. The down side is it sands hard. So use it to seale of the area rough it in then follow it with standard body filler. The brand I have been using the past five years is Evercoat Z grip. Sands nice/easy and never had any failure issues. I usually final sand with 80 grit then follow it with the Evercoat z grip 2part glaze which fills any pinholes in the filler and sand super easy with 180 grit.


Sorry kind of went off on a tangent for a simple question.
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Old September 9th, 2004, 08:12 AM   #5
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I've heard good things about using the epoxy type fillers that they use on airplanes. I can't remember a brand name but I've heard it refered to as "micro Balloons" Supposedly it has the same rate of contracting/expanding as steel so you get a good repair that wont crack on you later. It's even used to create minor structural parts in small air craft.

The Draw back, It must cure at least 12 hours and it's more expensive the traditional fillers

I went to a seminar a while back and it was very informative. The speaker details private jets and does the body repair work to them as well.

I'l have to see if I can dig up a brand name...
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Old September 9th, 2004, 08:43 AM   #6
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Rage Gold, Rage Xtreme, Zgrip, Tiger hair, Glasslite, and Everglass. These are the cream of the crop when it comes to bodyfillers for automotive repair. I would put a skim coat of Everglass, which is short-strand reinforced filler, then go over it with Z-grip, mixed with a bit of Metal Glaze (Evercoat's most used glazing putty). Any of the Evercoat fillers with the Metalworks label on them can be mixed together. It will keep pinholes down, and spread more evenly. And by the way, the miracle ingredient you're looking for is Hattonite. And it's in Z-Grip. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img] If you need any more help, message me. I also might be able to ship you filler. It's not a hazardous material like paint, so I can probably get you a pretty good deal...
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Old September 9th, 2004, 12:15 PM   #7
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i reckon they recommend a primer , ratrodvw whats best? what do you use
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Old September 9th, 2004, 12:44 PM   #8
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For what? If it's a large area of bare metal, I would recommend DP Primer. It's a non-sanding Epoxy primer, that would do a good job of sealing the metal. Then after the DP, I would do my bodywork and filler work. Then goes another coat of a sanding primer, like K36. Block it out, throw another coat of DP primer reduced with 1/2 part of DT reducer (it becomes a sealer when reduced). Then you are ready for paint! [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img]
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Old September 10th, 2004, 03:44 PM   #9
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I always hear different procedures, what should go on 1st then 2nd. Baremetal then primer then filler, or filler then primer?
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Old September 10th, 2004, 03:50 PM   #10
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Kind of both... It can be done both ways. I prefer primer then filler. I would use DP over bare metal because it's a good foundation for a good paintjob. Then filler work, (or another coat of a sanding primer, then filler) more primer over the filler (something that sands easy) then sealer, then paint. There are many variations, but you usually want to seal the metal with something before you put filler down, or at least that's what I'd do. When you get serious about doing it, I'll get the product sheets for everything, and post them for you...
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Old September 10th, 2004, 04:48 PM   #11
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Evercoat is nice isht.. you wana look for the stuff with the finest grains posible (usualy "euro style" has pretty fine grains)
If its on a place that may flex you'r gona want to put down some Tiger Hair or Kitty Hair which is a fiber glass based filler, down first.

The fiberglass will flex more than normal plastic filler, then after you get 1-3 coats of fiberglass filler down do the rest in plastic filler (smoother)
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Old September 10th, 2004, 04:50 PM   #12
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I always thought "Rage Gold" sounded like a Condom, either that or a Strip Club. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/funny.gif[/img]
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Old September 11th, 2004, 11:32 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by Bluspecs@Sep 9 2004, 08:12 AM
I've heard good things about using the epoxy type fillers that they use on airplanes. I can't remember a brand name but I've heard it refered to as "micro Balloons" Supposedly it has the same rate of contracting/expanding as steel so you get a good repair that wont crack on you later. It's even used to create minor structural parts in small air craft.

The Draw back, It must cure at least 12 hours and it's more expensive the traditional fillers

I went to a seminar a while back and it was very informative. The speaker details private jets and does the body repair work to them as well.

I'l have to see if I can dig up a brand name...
Epoxy fillers are homemade using epoxy and fillers such as micro-balloons (micro-spheres) or silca fibers. You can purchase the epoxy and filler materials at boat suppliers like West Marine. Epoxy is cool because it will adhere to anything even styrofoam and neoprene without destroying it. (try applying fiberglass resin to styrofoam)

Micro-balloons are simply glass spheres don't spill them on the floor. The make sanding easier. Silica fibers are another form of glass fibers the help make the epoxy more heat resistant. Other fillers include talc and carbon black each adds special properties.

Epoxy is based on a chemical called epicholrohydrin. (I used to work at a plant where it was made) EPI or ECH is very dangerous and you want to be sure you work with uncured epoxy in a well ventilated area even better wear a chemical cartridge respirator suitable for organic vapors. Once cured treat the epoxy as you would fiberglass, wear a dust respirator a real one not a paper mask (useless).

If you go with epoxy invest some money in the pump systems. One pump for the gallon can and another for the smaller can of hardener. Once you use epoxy like West System or System three you will be impressed with the strenght and ease of use.
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