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Old February 10th, 2015, 09:00 PM   #201
Unkl Ian
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

Quote of the day:
"Part of really knowing how
to do something,
includes knowing when “not” to."
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Old February 15th, 2015, 05:28 PM   #202
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5 Creativity Myths
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Old February 15th, 2015, 05:33 PM   #203
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The rocker is a beautiful piece. I keep going back to the photos and finding more neat little details.
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Old February 15th, 2015, 05:49 PM   #204
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Can't take any credit for the design,
I just combined the materials.

All the self declared "experts" told me it would break,
because burls are not strong enough, or some such rubbish.

Never had a problem, no cracks, nothing.
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Old February 15th, 2015, 06:49 PM   #205
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You mean 'expert' as in, 'X' being an unknown quantity and 'spert,' being a drip under pressure?
Anyway you look at it, your execution of the combining of materials is wonderfully done.
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Old February 15th, 2015, 07:02 PM   #206
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Glad you like it.

Yes, "Expert" as in:
"I think I read something, somewhere, out of context,
so that must be true, even though I have never tried
anything remotely similar, or know anyone who has."
Just like the internet.

Burl Veneer has a reputation for being brittle,
since it has a lot of end grain. Solid burl is totally different.
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Old February 15th, 2015, 07:16 PM   #207
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I also have an arm chair, and a couple small
pedestal tables, in Walnut. All Sam Maloof style.
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Old February 19th, 2015, 07:00 PM   #208
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The best way to predict
the future, is to create it.


Peter Drucker
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Old February 20th, 2015, 09:34 PM   #209
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Steve Jobs:
The Biggest Secret About Life and Success
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Old February 21st, 2015, 03:12 PM   #210
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18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently
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Old February 24th, 2015, 12:41 PM   #211
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

Quote of the day:
Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes.
Art is knowing which ones to keep.

-Scott Adams (Dilbert)
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Old February 25th, 2015, 10:53 PM   #212
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“Learning is not compulsory – neither is survival.”
W Edwards Deming
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Old February 27th, 2015, 07:10 PM   #213
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Advice from Zack Arias:
Don't Wait Until You're Ready
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Old March 12th, 2015, 07:55 AM   #214
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http://blog.creativelive.com/brave-b...ent=&utm_term=

Do You Have to Be Brave to Be an Artist?

by Erin Blakemore


“I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.” – Nelson Mandela
When faced with art that exposes vulnerabilities, expresses intense emotions, and dares to forge deep connections, we tend to applaud the artist’s bravery. After all, it takes guts to make great art. But do you have to be brave to make great art? I’m relieved to say that the answer is no.
There’s a fallacy that artists never feel fear. After all, their stock in trade is confrontation, excavation, and bold expression. But when you dig a bit deeper, you’ll start to realize that nearly every artist copes with fear in some way. That’s because the process of being creative is by its nature risky and vulnerable. Making art means declaring your worth and claiming other people’s attention—and it doesn’t get much scarier than that
In fact, great courage coexists with fear, in art and in life. It can be easy to mistake a finished, polished product for a bold statement, but more likely it reflects a daily practice of living with and facing down fear. To me, the bravest art is created in spite of fear, not without it.
By focusing on finished products instead of practice and process, we deny ourselves the true lessons of fear. I find that I’m easily caught up in the end goal instead of the present moment—the only moment in which I can, in fact, create. If I were to wait for a day when I have no fear, I’d never create at all. There’s always something to be afraid of: success, failure, criticism, visibility. But strangely, the more I focus on the need to be brave and bold as an artist, the less I produce. By avoiding fear, I tiptoe around the very fuel that gives texture and authenticity to my art.
The more I learn about myself and my creative fears, the more I realize that the only thing I should really fear is not showing up at all. Brené Brown put it best: “It feels dangerous to show up. But it’s not as terrifying as thinking, at the end of our lives, ‘What if I had shown up? What would have been different?’”
Perhaps our biggest fear should be using fear to opt out of our most potent creative challenges altogether.
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Old March 12th, 2015, 10:14 AM   #215
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"Art is putting yourself on display. and I think every artist
is equal parts hopeless introvert and narsasistic extrovert,
thus your always afraid that what you do sucks balls,
while simultaneously believing your the greatest artist that has ever lived...
its not bravery, its insanity"

Jeff Allison.
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Old March 20th, 2015, 09:45 AM   #216
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Typography mistakes.
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Old March 28th, 2015, 04:41 PM   #217
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Mike Browne: Fear is a creativity killer.
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Old April 3rd, 2015, 08:15 PM   #218
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Chase Jarvis: Fear, quitting, and sharing.
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Old April 9th, 2015, 12:11 AM   #219
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Great posts Unkl. Just wanted to let ya know!
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Old April 9th, 2015, 08:46 AM   #220
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Thanks.
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Old April 10th, 2015, 08:10 AM   #221
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10 quotes on creativity.

“Every child is an artist, the problem
is staying an artist when you grow up”
– Pablo Picasso

“If you hear a voice within you say,
‘You cannot paint,’ then by all means paint,
and that voice will be silenced”
– Vincent Van Gogh

“Have no fear of perfection, you’ll never reach it”
– Salvador Dali

”Creativity is a drug, I cannot live without”
– Cecil B. Demille

“Curiosity about life in all of its aspects,
I think, is still the secret of great creative people”
– Leo Burnett

“Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity. It’s self-conscious, and anything self-conscious
is lousy.
You can’t try to do things.
You simply must do things”
– Ray Bradbury

”Creativity takes courage.”
– Henri Matisse

”The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources”
– Albert Einstein

“You can’t wait for inspiration,
you have to go after it with a club”
– Jack London

“The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.”
– Sylvia Plath
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Old April 16th, 2015, 06:05 PM   #222
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when it comes to price, context is everything



"The other day at the grocery store, I hesitated when spending almost a dollar on a packet of my favorite French vanilla cocoa mix. But while I was there, I couldn’t help thinking that at Starbucks, I don’t bat an eye at spending over $5 for my soy vanilla spice latte.
In the grocery store, where the place is designed to make me super aware of price and “bargains”, I hesitate. At Starbucks, where the atmosphere is designed to make me feel comfortable and a little indulgent, I happily hand over my card every single time.
As someone who makes artisan products, I want my brand to resonate on the Starbucks side. Yet I see so many makers whose supporting materials (display, fixtures, sales presentation, etc.) are more like the maker equivalent of the grocery store.
Creating more freedom in your business comes from being able to charge more. And being able to charge more comes from your brand.

Everything in my trade show booth is meant to tell you that I am not a bargain brand. The walls, the paint color, the custom display fixtures, the way I display the work itself, what I wear, and how I style myself. Before someone even walks into my booth, they know that I’m not cheap.
When I tell someone to raise their prices, I often hear that “people won’t pay” or that “the market won’t support that.” But the truth is that’s it’s likely that their brand won’t support higher prices. Building the brand takes work, and it’s definitely easier to blame outside forces for price resistance.
It’s the whole package (your brand), not just your products, that tell people how much to value your work. And if your package screams “cheap and easy,” people won’t value your work very much.
I work in very inexpensive materials, especially for the jewelry industry. But that doesn’t mean I can’t style my brand to appear higher end. In the context of the whole package I’ve built, even my materials seem richer.
It’s not a coincidence that the clearer I’ve gotten with my brand, the less price resistance I’ve gotten. When it comes to price, context is everything.
Building a brand takes work. It takes a clear aesthetic vision, strong messaging, and well considered details repeated over and over again. But the payoff is huge. The stronger your brand, the more you can charge for the work you make. And the more you can charge, the more free you are to create more of your best work.
Having a strong brand is the difference between slinging cans at the grocery store or artfully crafting lattes for your customers. Which would you rather do?"

Megan Auman
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Old April 20th, 2015, 06:14 PM   #223
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http://www.fastcompany.com/3045111/h...reative-people

Five Habits of Creative People

Whether it's getting into a routine or knowing when to give up, here are the habits creative people have cultivated.

By Art Markman
There is no secret trick to becoming more creative, but the good news is creativity is a skill you can build.
That means that you can become more creative with the right time and effort. Whenever you are picking up a new skill, though, it is good to find role models who have the abilities you want and to follow their lead.
Over the past 10 years, I have written quite a bit about creativity. Along the way, I have encountered the stories of a number of individuals who have inspired me to think about what it takes to improve my own creative abilities. These individuals have been able to solve problems (both practical and artistic) in new ways. Here are five habits that emerge from their efforts.
They Study the Details.

A number of people I have talked to have worried that their ability to be creative might be hampered by knowing too much. They feel like having too much knowledge will curse them into sticking with their routines.
Creative individuals delve into the details of the problems they are trying to solve. When Fiona Fairhurst and her design team at Speedo were trying to create a swimsuit that would help swimmers shave seconds off their times, they looked at all kinds of ways to reduce the forces of drag. Their final design drew from many different sources including the structure of shark skin and the use of stretch materials that decreased swimmer’s muscle vibrations.
Similarly, the Swiss engineer George de Mestral noticed that pesky cockleburs would stick to his dog’s fur after going out for a walk. He studied the cockleburs under a microscope and found that they stuck so persistently because tiny hooks on the seed would get caught in the dog’s tangled fur. Using this principle, he had cloth manufacturers create synthetic cocklebur hooks and dog fur and invented Velcro.
They Have Developed a Disciplined Routine.

The standard image of the creative genius is one of a tortured soul who works in fits of inspiration in between bouts of self-destructive behavior. But, many of the most creative people are much more disciplined than that. They treat their creativity like a job and work at it consistently.
You cannot wait for the muse. You have to work hard before it appears. A classic example of this type is the prolific author Stephen King. If ever there was someone whose work would fit the expected output of a tortured soul, it would be King’s. Yet, he has talked often about the role of routines in his work. He writes every morning. As he points out, routines for creativity are just as important as routines for sleeping. You cannot wait for the muse. You have to work hard before it appears.
They Realize That Everything Is Important

As a college professor, my least favorite question asked by students is: "Will this be on the exam?" The answer to that question is always: "Yes, but it may not be my exam." That is because you never know what the source of a great idea is going to be. The stories behind creative ideas are fascinating to read, but they are only clear in retrospect.
For example, James Dyson’s inspiration for the bagless vacuum cleaner came from his knowledge of the industrial cyclones used to clear the air in sawmills. When Dyson’s curiosity led him to learn about sawmills, he could not have known that knowledge would form the basis of a multimillion dollar company.
A key to creativity is to pursue knowledge without a sense of whether it will be relevant in the future. Too often, people assume that they can judge in advance what they need to understand and what they do not. Instead, creative people build up their knowledge base so that they will be ready for the opportunities that come later.
They Consider The Timing.

Truly successful creative endeavors are products that fit into their time. That means that creative individuals need to understand both the technical aspects of their craft as well as the context in which the work is being done.
Consider the great jazz trumpet player Miles Davis. Davis cut his musical teeth during the bebop era. Bebop was characterized by fast flurries of notes played with technical precision over fast chord changes. He began to react against this style in recordings starting in the late 1940s, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that the world was ready for the sound that characterized albums like Birth Of The Cool (which was released well after it was recorded) and Kind Of Blue, which had an enormous impact both on listeners and other players.
By the late 1960s, Davis was ready to react against the prevailing context again with his early fusion album Bitches Brew. The key to the success of these works was an understanding of the system in which they were being recorded and heard.
On the technical side of innovation, Steve Jobs was a master at understanding the role of the system. The iPod was not the first MP3 player on the market. Jobs thought deeply about the user and the situation in which the iPod would be used. The attention to the context in which the device would be employed led to the parallel development of iTunes, which made the iPod a true plug-and-play device.
They Know When To Give Up

Finally, when you look at stories of creativity, it is easy to be seduced by the persistence of creative people. Not only did James Dyson take inspiration from far-flung sources, but he also spent years working on the prototype of the original Dyson vacuum.
Creative success means knowing when to throw in the towel and move on to something else. There is a danger in drawing the lesson that creative people stick with every idea in order to see them through. Economists have the concept of a sunk cost. Sunk costs are the time, energy, and money that have already been invested in a project. Good decisions do not allow sunk costs to have an undue impact on choices. Just because you have already spent a lot of time or money on a project does not mean that time will have been wasted if you walk away from the project. Instead, you should evaluate projects by whether they are likely to succeed with continued effort, independent of the investment you have made so far.
Richard Nisbett and his colleagues have studied successful creative individuals (like academics who work at the forefront of their disciplines). The ones who are most successful in the long run are actually those who are willing to walk away from projects that are not succeeding, even when they have already put considerable effort into those projects. That is, creative success means knowing when to throw in the towel and move on to something else.
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Old April 30th, 2015, 11:42 AM   #224
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You Can Have an Easy Life or an Awesome One. Choose Wisely.

by James Victore

"A few years back after one of my more impassioned lectures, a young buck in the back row raised his hand. “Mr. Victore,” he said,
“I understand what you’re saying about taking risks in your career, but I’ve got rent to pay.”
I was shocked by his defeatist attitude, saddened at how the practicalities of life had already beaten this young creative soul down so that his biggest ambition in life was to pay rent.
Gone was adventurous youth. This kid was no longer the hero of his own life, willing to face his fears and slay the dragons that kept him from his reward. He was already sheepishly waving a white flag out the window of his mini van.
“What’s your name?” I asked. “Thomas,” he said.
“Thomas, here’s your tombstone: Here lies Thomas, he would have done great work, but he had to pay the rent.”
“Here lies Thomas, he would have done great work, but he had to pay the rent.”
Which brings us to my point: Everything you desire in life has a price and you have to be willing to accept that price. If you desire to do great work, it will cost you. Likewise, security and comfort will cost you. If you want a luxury apartment with a wrap-around sectional couch in leather with stainless steel legs, it will cost you.
But here’s the thing: I’d rather be exhausted striving for excellence than churning out work that succeeds merely because it offends the least amount of people. The cost? The fear of financial uncertainty. But I willingly accept this cost because it allows me to follow my path and craft the type of career and lifestyle that I want and need. There are things that I will not compromise on, including my sanity, happiness, time with my family, spontaneous travel with my son, and creative control in the work I choose to take on. If I fail, I will fail on my own terms, doing what I love.
Taking a creative risk and stepping off the status quo treadmill requires bravery. It demands embracing risk, and fighting the good fight to face your fears of financial doom without bailing at the first sign of discom- fort. The discomfort is just a test. It’s a test of your commitment and enthusiasm—a test of your endur- ance and how much you want it.
If I fail, I will fail on my own terms.
It takes creative courage to make these hard decisions about your life and career, and to do what is in your heart. It takes gigantic cojones to serve your vision of a creative life, not blindly following the practical advice of your parents or friends.

Creative courage means not being content to let your Gift rot while pursuing a path that others have prescribed for you, creeping along in the safety of a status quo life. It means refusing to join the ranks of those around you bragging about their lack of commitment to their lives. It means having the bravery to leave a job that chafes or saying “No” to a high-dollar marketing client that you don’t actually believe in.
There are times when you need to re-tailor an ill-fitting life. These are the times that will define you—the moments you seek out your dragons and slay them when they rise. This is the courage to be creative."


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Old July 7th, 2015, 07:16 AM   #225
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Thank You!
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