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Old April 5th, 2012, 05:56 PM   #101
Unkl Ian
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

Milon Townsend on Donations

Milon Townsend is an artist, successful in his chosen field, so his thoughts might be of interest.

From his book Making & Marketing Better Artwork,
Blue Moon Press 2001:

"Chapter 6. Donations

Artists often get 'over-asked' to donate work to various charitable

organizations and causes. You will find it helpful to have a plan for handling
these requests, so that you do not have to evaluate the relative merits of each
request on a case-by-case basis.

If you gave to everyone that asked, you'd have little time left to carry on with

and would become unable to support the things that are actually important to
you. There are many valid reasons for giving - you will have to decide which
reasons are the most compelling for you.

-Belief in the cause/organization


This is the BEST reason. It may lead you to give pieces, time, or money. You

might give on an initiative basis, without being asked. You will RECEIVE the
most from this type of giving, since you are investing the fruits of your labors
directly in the areas of life that mean the most to you.

-Exposure


Many causes soliciting donations tell you how much 'exposure' you'll receive by

having your piece in their auction or having your name listed in their program.
If exposure is a significant factor in your decision, realistically evaluate the
type of exposure that the event will generate.

[SNIP]


-Fringe Benefits

There are other possible benefits to you when donating your work. Actively
pursue and confirm the ones that have value to you.
[SNIP]

You should honestly admit to yourself the reasons that you are donating artwork
to each cause that you support. If your offering is due to a strong belief in
the cause itself, you ought not object if perks are curtailed in order to retain
more of the proceeds for the cause itself. If the fringe benefits are the point ...[snip]"

"-Minimum bids

You will feel irritated or even frustrated if one of your valuable pieces is

sold for a tiny fraction of its value at a benefit auction.
Require a minimum bid for the sale of your piece to take place. This is usually
the wholesale value of the piece. If the group cannot obtain wholesale value of
the piece at auction, and you really want to support them anyway, you'd be
better off just selling the piece yourself and giving them the money.You do not
want to have your work perceived as not retaining value. This is one risk you
take in offering it for auction. If it does not sell at a good price, that may
negatively affect the perception of value. On the other hand, if more than one
person desires your piece, and the price rises above the norm, that will
increase the perceived value of your work.

-Other ways of giving


There are other means than giving artwork for you to support a cause in which

you believe.
* Send actual money.
* Volunteer your time to help put on the event.
* Volunteer to teach on behalf of the cause.
* Be a mentor to other artists or members of the group.
* Support your local arts group.
* If you are well known, lend your name to the enterprise.

-Develop the ability to say no.


You will receive more requests for donations than you are able to fulfill. Learn

to politely, but clearly, refuse. If you are already involved in supporting
something else, mention that fact. It will silence most applicants for your
favors. Do not feel in any way bad or guilty for turning down a request.

-Give pro-actively.


Choose the organizations or causes that you believe in, and give generously in

whatever way works best for you. you will find that what you give out comes
back."

The book, is very well written, and covers what is involved in running a
successful business as an artist. Starting with promotional literature, pricing,
wholesale/retail, dealing with galleries, shipping and packaging, photographing
your work, and running a studio.
Available from Thebluemoonpress.com

Hopefully this will prompt some thought and discussion.

Unkl Ian
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Old April 5th, 2012, 06:12 PM   #102
Unkl Ian
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

Drew Brophy is a successful surf artist in California.
http://drewbrophy.com/
His wife, Maria, is his agent and brand manager.
She has a blog, that covers the business side
of being a successful artist.http://mariabrophy.com/

A recent post on her blog:



The problem with Donating Art and the Solution

The folks that put on these fundraisers are not malicious people. They just don’t understand how selling donated art at low prices hurts the art community.Lori Woodward, Fine Artist


We recently sent Drew to a fundraiser put on by Hinano Tahiti, one of our clients. They asked Drew to do a live, custom painting of a surfboard at the event, which was to be auctioned that night.
There was an exciting bidding war between two men, and of course only one could “win”. It was fun watching the interaction!
We charged a fee to have Drew paint the surfboard at the event. They sold the painting for three times as much and one happy gent went home with the painting. The charity made out and it was a win-win for all.
Hinano Tahiti understood the importance of providing top quality work at auction. They also appreciated Drew’s time and had no problem compensating him for it. If only all fundraisers worked this way…

There are many great charities in the world,
and they need your art! But there can be problems with donating art to charities.

The good news is, together we can help charities to get better quality artwork by encouraging them to create a new way of working with artist donations.

THE PROBLEM CHARITIES HAVE BY NOT SHARING REVENUE WITH THE ARTISTS:
You’ll go broke giving to every charity that asks. I know we used to give to anyone who called. It was flattering at first. Then, as years went on, I found many, many problems with giving blindly and not asking for anything in return.

For one, we were losing money we couldn’t afford to. We already had our personal charities that we donated money to.
For another, it was taking a lot of our time and energy. And some of the people we were giving to sadly did not appreciate it.
And lastly, we found that we weren’t wanting to give the best artwork, but rather tempted to give the items that didn’t sell.
Drew and I attended a Surf Industry Ball a few summers ago. It’s a black tie event held yearly at the beautiful St. Regis Resort. They hold a charity auction, both silent and live. Many people who attend are wealthy and have no problem bidding on $10,000-$100,000 items.
You would think an event such as this would attract quality artwork. But in the silent auction, there were amateur pieces. There were also a few pieces of art from successful artists that appeared as though they took art that wasn’t selling in their studio and donated it to get rid of it.
Auctioning low quality art at a black tie event does not work. But I also know, first hand, that this event does not share in the revenue with the artist donating the work.

And that’s a problem. If the charity is not making it worthwhile financially to donate art, they are not going to attract quality art.


HOW MANY CHARITABLE DONATIONS SHOULD YOU MAKE?
Choose 2 or 3 charities that you care about and give to them. By focusing on just a few charities, you can actually make a difference with your donations. After your chosen few, give only to organizations that share in the revenues of the sales. Never donate anything if it will hurt you financially.
Every day I receive 3 to 4 e-mails and calls from people, friends and clients who ask for a donation. This is the downside to having a lot of friends and doing too much networking!

The requests range from the local High School grad night event to very prestigious events and everything in between.

Always, the charities are excellent organizations which are doing wonderful things. It’s hard to turn these people away, particularly if the person is a friend or client.
But if I gave to even half of the requests, I’d have to shut my business down and get a real job, God forbid!
Usually for the small stuff, like the High School, I’ll donate art prints that are just sitting in the studio. It’s not a problem to do that.
But for the black-tie events, we would not want to donate anything but top quality artwork. Otherwise, what’s the point? If you donate artwork that’s less quality compared to what you are proud of, than you will detract new collectors and you’ll make a bad name for yourself.

But on the other hand, when donating your best work, you’ll need to be compensated.


Together, we can convince the charities out there that it’s in their best interest to make it enticing for artists to donate their best works.

CHALLENGES WITH CHARITABLE REQUESTS THAT WE CAN HELP TO CHANGE:
  • Many charities do not give the artist a portion of the proceeds.
  • The expenses out of pocket for art supplies, canvas and frames: Many charities ask for Drew’s painted surfboards. The surfboard itself costs us $400 – $600 depending on the quality and size. And then there’s the art supplies and time to paint it.
  • IRS Does not Value Artist’s Time: We are not able to write off the amount of time it takes to paint. The IRS only allows you to write off your materials, which artists do anyway. You are often better off writing a check for the charity rather than giving them art (unless they split the revenue).
  • Nothing to Gain: Other than feeling good about your contribution, there is little to gain. There is no marketing value to these events, unless your name and art is printed on all of their brochures and advertising (this rarely happens).
  • Art can auction for less than it’s worth: Occasionally the paintings we have contributed have auctioned off for less than our collectors pay. This hurts the artist, the collectors and the value of the art.
THERE IS A SOLUTION!
A few years ago we instituted guidelines for charities. I wrote about it on Drew Brophy’s blog back in September – you can read that here.
And thanks to Lori Woodard’s point of view written in her article titled FUNDRAISERS THAT DO IT RIGHT on Fine Art Views Blog last week, I’ve been inspired to fine-tune how I handle the requests. I’ve tidied up a form letter that I now am sending to every request for a donation. There is a copy at the bottom of this post.
TOGETHER, ARTISTS CAN HELP CREATE A WIN-WIN FOR CHARITIES, ARTISTS AND COLLECTORS:
Artists, let’s all get on the same page here and help educate the fundraisers and charities that need our help. If we encourage them to, Charities will make it easier for artists to donate their top quality art. It’s a win-win for everyone.
Feel free to copy and use my form letter below:


Drew Brophy CHARITABLE DONATION GUIDELINES
Thank you for the opportunity to donate art to your organization.

Drew Brophy would be honored to have his artwork and his name associated with yours.
Due to the extremely heavy volume of requests from many important charities, we’ve developed guidelines that enable us to donate artwork at less than retail cost.
These requirements also help us reduce losses since current U.S. tax laws are unfavorable to artist donations. (There is little to no write-off for artwork.)
Please consider that by offering these terms for all artist donations, your organization will: Attract top quality, high value artwork; and over time, will become known as the go-to-organization for unique and valuable art.
Our donation guidelines are:
  • The organization agrees to split the proceeds from the sale or auction 50/50 (50% to Drew Brophy and 50% to the organization). We ask for payment within 5 business days of the sale. The name, address, phone and e-mail of the buyer will be provided to Drew Brophy for his “collector’s club” records.
  • A minimum or a reserve price will be set and will be designated by Drew Brophy. (This is required to honor the value of the artwork for our existing collectors and our partner galleries.)
  • In the event the artwork does not sell, it will be returned by the organization to Drew Brophy’s studio San Clemente, CA, within 9 business days.
If these guidelines are agreeable to you, please sign below

and return this form via e-mail to mariab@drewbrophy.com.


We agree to the above terms:
Name, Title______________________ Date ___________________
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Last edited by Unkl Ian; April 5th, 2012 at 07:35 PM.
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Old April 6th, 2012, 12:08 PM   #103
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

David Carson on design + discovery

"You have to utilize who you are in your work.
Nobody else can do that: nobody else can pull from your background, from your parents, your upbringing, your whole life experience.”



http://www.ted.com/talks/david_carson_on_design.html
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Old April 6th, 2012, 01:28 PM   #104
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http://drewbrophy.com/art-promotion-...t-it/#more-955

ART PROMOTION: The Business Card – Never Leave Home Without it!






The Business Card…..
This is so basic, but I’m amazed at how many artists will walk into my office, ask me to refer them for this and that, and when I ask for their business card they say, “oh, I don’t have one.” And I promptly smack them on the head for being absurd…..and give them the following lecture:


Never go anywhere without your business cards in your pocket or wallet. Place them in a spot that’s easy to get to (like a front pocket, coat pocket, whatever), that every time you meet someone and they say “what do you do” you’ll pull out a business card in 007 fashion, hand it to them and say, “I’m an artist.”
I find that when you tell someone you’re an artist, they get a picture in their head of what you do which is usually inaccurate. That’s why having a photo of your work printed on your card is essential. That way you don’t have to say “well, I do these really imaginative sculptures that…blah blah blah….” With a photo on the card, it makes what you do very clear.
ART SHOWS & EVENTS: Have your cards out in large quantity for people to pick up and take. Take it one step further and buy one of those nice little cardholders to put your cards in and place them in clear view at all events that you are involved in. You’ll look cool, too.


If you don’t have a business card, you are not taking your profession as an artist seriously. Business cards are your single most important tool (next to a website) and they are a cheap way of showing people what you do.
Your business card should be designed with the intention of making sure that it is so interesting that no one will ever throw it away! This is usually easy to do with art….. I feel for all those attorneys and accountants that can’t help but have BORING cards!


An ideal business card will be one that is printed on both sides – one side a photo of what you do, or your best or most popular sample of work. The other side should clearly state what you do (Joe Crazy, Muralist), your phone number, address (optional), website and your e-mail address.
I want you to be successful. Now go, get yerself a business card!


Maria Brophy xxoo
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Old April 6th, 2012, 06:12 PM   #105
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"Am I a Success or a Failure in This Complicated World



I had a conversation with a friend yesterday who has worked in the surf industry for many years. We were discussing business, the economy and life.
He was complimenting me on my great success.

This is a man I respect.


I didn’t have the heart to tell him that I feel like a failure.

The surf industry and the private club that it has become has not been very supportive of me. To some I am just some kook who will not go away.
I make a living despite them because real people and real surfers can see me and they know who I am. I guess in some ways I do feel successful, but not in the terms most people validate themselves.
My career has not brought me great wealth, but has allowed me to pursue my goals and dreams. My life is full of adventure, with great people, a wonderful family, and a freedom few enjoy.
I would love to have more financial stability but not at the cost of what I think is right or just.
Earlier in my career, I quit the two best gigs I ever had in the surf industry; the first tried to tell me I could not create art after work, they held my job over my head trying to try to instill fear in me and the other employees, by using me as an example. I quit on the spot because it was wrong.
I left the second company when it went in a direction I did not approve of, with new people I did not trust or want to work with. That was difficult to quit; I had to leave everything I worked so hard for and start over. My so called friends there thought I was stupid wasting my opportunities and turning down a great pay check.


Many Companies do not want to employ people like me, they want robots, yes-men and paper pushers.
That’s just not me and I am not going to change for anyone.
I want to get things done and speak my mind. They want to use me but they do not want me in their club to tell them they have become what all real surfers despise.
It seems I have always been here on the fringe, an outsider, independent. It is a very lonely place sometimes.
I know that I am lucky that enough people outside of the industry, like my art and can see me for who I am, to stand by me.


My wife and I could not have picked a more difficult way to make a living, but we have persevered beyond the surf industry and tried to lead the way for others like us.
We have had to invent new ways to do business as an artist and it has been a benefit to all artists. I have been a professional artist now for over twenty years and we have survived the last few years where many have not. I guess that is success.

It has been real people who have supported us over the years, and anyone who has met us in person knows what we are all about.

Our goal is to inspire people, and from reading many of your letters and feedback it has worked. Thank you for allowing me to chase my dreams and feed my family, it is only with your support that we do so.
I want to leave you with this request: Support people and companies who are up to good things. Abandon the false role models and leaders who occupy our world.
.
Somewhere out there beyond all the greed, advertising, propaganda, and spin is the truth. The world has become so complicated and corrupt that it is broken, from politics to banking to the silly surf industry, and maybe even the business that you’re in.
.
We are all responsible for what we tolerate, what we buy and what we choose to support.
.
Wake up! This is your only true power and voice.
.
I owe my simple career and what my friend calls success to the individuals who decided I was worthwhile and that I was up to good things.
.
There are many great role models, companies, and leaders out there, they need our support to succeed.
.
Life is Good,
Drew"

http://drewbrophy.com/am-i-a-success...licated-world/
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Old April 7th, 2012, 10:41 AM   #106
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

Thought for the day:

“There are two types of people--anchors and motors. Lose the anchors and get with the motors because the motors are going somewhere and they're having more fun. The anchors will just drag you down.”

Wyland, world famous marine artist
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Old April 7th, 2012, 02:58 PM   #107
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The Holstee Manifesto:
http://shop.holstee.com/pages/about


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Old May 15th, 2012, 09:40 AM   #108
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What to do, when someone steals your work
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Old May 15th, 2012, 12:31 PM   #109
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Incomplete Manifesto for Growth - Bruce Mau

http://www.brucemaudesign.com/4817/1...sto-for-growth

http://umcf.umn.edu/events/past/04nov-manifesto.pdf

    1. Allow events to change you.
      You have to be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it. You live it. The prerequisites for growth: the openness to experience events and the willingness to be changed by them.
    2. Forget about good.
      Good is a known quantity. Good is what we all agree on. Growth is not necessarily good. Growth is an exploration of unlit recesses that may or may not yield to our research. As long as you stick to good you’ll never have real growth.
    3. Process is more important than outcome.
      When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we’ve already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there.
    4. Love your experiments (as you would an ugly child).
      Joy is the engine of growth. Exploit the liberty in casting your work as beautiful experiments, iterations, attempts, trials, and errors. Take the long view and allow yourself the fun of failure every day.
    5. Go deep.
      The deeper you go the more likely you will discover something of value.
    6. Capture accidents.
      The wrong answer is the right answer in search of a different question. Collect wrong answers as part of the process. Ask different questions.
    7. Study.
      A studio is a place of study. Use the necessity of production as an excuse to study. Everyone will benefit.
    8. Drift.
      Allow yourself to wander aimlessly. Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism.
    9. Begin anywhere.
      John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere.
    10. Everyone is a leader.
      Growth happens. Whenever it does, allow it to emerge. Learn to follow when it makes sense. Let anyone lead.
    11. Harvest ideas.
      Edit applications. Ideas need a dynamic, fluid, generous environment to sustain life. Applications, on the other hand, benefit from critical rigor. Produce a high ratio of ideas to applications.
    12. Keep moving.
      The market and its operations have a tendency to reinforce success. Resist it. Allow failure and migration to be part of your practice.
    13. Slow down.
      Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves.
    14. Don’t be cool.
      Cool is conservative fear dressed in black. Free yourself from limits of this sort.
    15. Ask stupid questions.
      Growth is fueled by desire and innocence. Assess the answer, not the question. Imagine learning throughout your life at the rate of an infant.
    16. Collaborate.
      The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.
    17. ____________________.
      Intentionally left blank. Allow space for the ideas you haven’t had yet, and for the ideas of others.
    18. Stay up late.
      Strange things happen when you’ve gone too far, been up too long, worked too hard, and you’re separated from the rest of the world.
    19. Work the metaphor.
      Every object has the capacity to stand for something other than what is apparent. Work on what it stands for.
    20. Be careful to take risks.
      Time is genetic. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.
    21. Repeat yourself.
      If you like it, do it again. If you don’t like it, do it again.
    22. Make your own tools.
      Hybridize your tools in order to build unique things. Even simple tools that are your own can yield entirely new avenues of exploration. Remember, tools amplify our capacities, so even a small tool can make a big difference.
    23. Stand on someone’s shoulders.
      You can travel farther carried on the accomplishments of those who came before you. And the view is so much better.
    24. Avoid software.
      The problem with software is that everyone has it.
    25. Don’t clean your desk.
      You might find something in the morning that you can’t see tonight.
    26. Don’t enter awards competitions.
      Just don’t. It’s not good for you.
    27. Read only left-hand pages.
      Marshall McLuhan did this. By decreasing the amount of information, we leave room for what he called our "noodle."
    28. Make new words.
      Expand the lexicon. The new conditions demand a new way of thinking. The thinking demands new forms of expression. The expression generates new conditions.
    29. Think with your mind.
      Forget technology. Creativity is not device-dependent.
    30. Organization = Liberty.
      Real innovation in design, or any other field, happens in context. That context is usually some form of cooperatively managed enterprise. Frank Gehry, for instance, is only able to realize Bilbao because his studio can deliver it on budget. The myth of a split between "creatives" and "suits" is what Leonard Cohen calls a ‘charming artifact of the past.’
    31. Don’t borrow money.
      Once again, Frank Gehry’s advice. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not exactly rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed.
    32. Listen carefully.
      Every collaborator who enters our orbit brings with him or her a world more strange and complex than any we could ever hope to imagine. By listening to the details and the subtlety of their needs, desires, or ambitions, we fold their world onto our own. Neither party will ever be the same.
    33. Take field trips.
      The bandwidth of the world is greater than that of your TV set, or the Internet, or even a totally immersive, interactive, dynamically rendered, object-oriented, real-time, computer graphic–simulated environment.
    34. Make mistakes faster.
      This isn’t my idea — I borrowed it. I think it belongs to Andy Grove.
    35. Imitate.
      Don’t be shy about it. Try to get as close as you can. You’ll never get all the way, and the separation might be truly remarkable. We have only to look to Richard Hamilton and his version of Marcel Duchamp’s large glass to see how rich, discredited, and underused imitation is as a technique.
    36. Scat.
      When you forget the words, do what Ella did: make up something else … but not words.
    37. Break it, stretch it, bend it, crush it, crack it, fold it.
    38. Explore the other edge.
      Great liberty exists when we avoid trying to run with the technological pack. We can’t find the leading edge because it’s trampled underfoot. Try using old-tech equipment made obsolete by an economic cycle but still rich with potential.
    39. Coffee breaks, cab rides, green rooms.
      Real growth often happens outside of where we intend it to, in the interstitial spaces — what Dr. Seuss calls "the waiting place." Hans Ulrich Obrist once organized a science and art conference with all of the infrastructure of a conference — the parties, chats, lunches, airport arrivals — but with no actual conference. Apparently it was hugely successful and spawned many ongoing collaborations.
    40. Avoid fields.
      Jump fences. Disciplinary boundaries and regulatory regimes are attempts to control the wilding of creative life. They are often understandable efforts to order what are manifold, complex, evolutionary processes. Our job is to jump the fences and cross the fields.
    41. Laugh.
      People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I’ve become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves.
    42. Remember.
      Growth is only possible as a product of history. Without memory, innovation is merely novelty. History gives growth a direction. But a memory is never perfect. Every memory is a degraded or composite image of a previous moment or event. That’s what makes us aware of its quality as a past and not a present. It means that every memory is new, a partial construct different from its source, and, as such, a potential for growth itself.
    43. Power to the people.
      Play can only happen when people feel they have control over their lives. We can’t be free agents if we’re not free.
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Old May 15th, 2012, 12:42 PM   #110
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The Expert Enough manifesto:

http://expertenough.com/538/the-expert-enough-manifesto

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Old June 6th, 2012, 09:37 AM   #111
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From Chase Jarvis:
http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/201...l-for-success/

The Hit List: 13 Things Crucial For Your Success [In Any Field]

By Chase on November 29, 2011


Success is each to his or her own, but let’s call it like we see it: when you survey the landscape of your creative world, your industry, your career or hobby–whatever field you’re in– there are several fundamentals to achieving success, regardless of the measure. There are commonalities that are undeniable. So here’s a list of thirteen such things that you should be doing right now – let’s call it your hit list:

1. Get shit done.
Over-thinking, pontificating, and wondering are tools for the slacker. People don’t care what almost happened, or what your problems are or why something wasn’t. They care about what is, and what will be. That requires actually making stuff happen. Pros do, make, ship, send, publish, post and deliver; amateurs sit around and wonder, or worse, scratch their arse.

2. Educate yourself.
Think someone else is responsible for your education? Think again. And don’t fool yourself that being in school, in class, or in the seminar actually equals education. Education is incredibly active and it should be self directed in some capacity. Seek information. Knock down walls to get it.

3. Make your own rules.
There are a million paths to get to any single destination. And while it helps to know the rules that others have played by in the past–those you admire who have come there before you–don’t let those rules alone define your rules or your actions. Be respectful as you make your own rules, don’t be rude. But be prepared to chop your own path through the weeds and fend off the naysayers, because if you’re doing something worthwhile there will likely be resistance to your way.

4. Want to be a legend? Affect change.

5. Want to affect change? Get to work. See #1

6. Iterate.
Nothing–and I’ll say it again, but louder–NOTHING will spring from your creative self fully formed. Genius, clarity, vision–whatever you want to call it–will come in fragments at inopportune moments over days, weeks, months, years. Be ready to catch each one of the iterations and push it out of you. The summary of those iterations will aggregate into something special.

7. Look inside.
Understand that the best way to make something new and fresh is to look inside you. The answers are in here, not out there.

8. Don’t underestimate the fundamentals. Know your craft.
Vision and big-picture-thinking are important, but not at the expense of the fundamentals. You’ve got know the nuts and bolts of what your doing. Skip this item at your own risk.

9. Take a deep breath.
Life, work, art can be hard. Anxiety – not to be confused with the positive stress of deadlines and forced production schedules – is counter productive. So when shit is getting hairy, take a breath. Everything is going to be okay. When you re-center, see #1.

10. Take delight.
Your work should be fun. Not always fun like a birthday party fun, but fun like you’re doing the right thing sort of fun. Stimulating. Positive. Energizing. Take delight in what you do, and for that matter, what others do too. Celebrate successes, pop champagne or Diet Coke when you break through tough challenges. Stay up all night when the ideas are flowing, because you can. Enjoy the process, because from moment to moment, the process is reason for the season – it’s all you’ve got. If you don’t take delight, your career will be short, either by choice or by fate.

11. Seek out good people.
Think you’re on a solo journey? On the contrary. Making your work, your career, your life, will involve others taking to you and what you do. Therefore, make effort to know, connect, collaborate with, mentor under, the best people you can find. Screw that, the best people you can FATHOM. And once you identify them, seek them. Make an effort to cultivate those relationships and take those good people with you – figuratively and literally – on your journey. Good people tend to attract other good people. And so for similar reasons, it should go without saying, avoid jerks, d-bags, and haters. It’s hard to soar like an eagle when you run around with turkeys. Negative energy is like a black hole for creativity and inspiration. And remember, you are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.

12. Find some quiet.
Noise, stimulation, and adventure are good for creating the raw building blocks of creativity, but they suck for the most important part of creativity — the synthesis. Synthesis–the gluing together of your ideas–requires some sort of quiet, be it just a moment or bunch of moments. So carve out this time.

13. Help others.
When chasing success too many people play the ‘me’ game. It’s all about ‘me’. Well, contrary to what it might seem, success ain’t just about me. Most people who achieve success are concerned with helping others. Helping others cultivates understanding, humility, compassion, and your network – not to mention, a better world. So don’t just reach up and pull yourself there. Be sure to reach sideways and down too, as often as you can muster.



Thanks. Spread the word.
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Old June 8th, 2012, 05:45 PM   #112
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

"Often, people with big ideas
find themselves alone
until after all the hard work is done,
then everyone else
can see the beauty in it."

Drew Brophy, artist.
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Old August 16th, 2012, 01:56 PM   #113
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http://faso.com/fineartviews/30582/e...-the-ugly-myth

Exposure: The ugly myth.
By Jack White
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Old August 30th, 2012, 08:56 PM   #114
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http://www.drivenmavens.com/2012/08/...t-of-the-best/

My Drawings Suck! Why Can’t I Compete with the Best of the Best?

by Arvind Ramkrishna on August 30, 2012


"I received an email the other day from a student that was really upset about his level of progress in design school. Truthfully, I get this sort of email all the time. They generally begin with, ” I constantly struggle to keep up with my classmates but every sketch that I create ends up looking like crap and I feel that I am not cutout for this industry.”
These sort of feelings are normal. Everyone feels intimidated by the level of talent out there. However, the very anxiety you feel ends up becoming the very factor the prohibits your progress. The more you think about what others are doing and how well they are doing, only creates more anxiety for yourself, thus preventing you from spending the focused energy to get your job done.
It really boils down to a few questions that you need to ask yourself to sort of “re-calibrate” your mind.
1. Do you have raw artistic talent?
2. Are you really into the subject matter?
3. How much focused effort are you putting in every day?
4. Are you setting weekly goals to accomplish?
5. What are you willing to give up in your normal routine in order to accomplish your goals?
6. Am I going over and above the requirements?
Most “lack of progress” is due to not having solid answers for the above questions. Now if you are considering drawing as a hobby, then you don’t need to put as much effort as a typical student. Why? There simply is no pressure to perform. However, when you are in school, there is competition, and the top students usually get the prized job.


As a working professional, I have developed my own drive, ambition, and quest for knowledge. Without having this drive, it is hard to learn because you are not actively searching for it. You are more or less thrown into the pressure of having to learn then wanting to learn. This quest for knowledge is what helps you to strip away your fears and learn for the sake of learning and gathering information. At a younger age, this is very hard to grasp for some people. The young mind is often distracted with so many other events that take place in their life that it takes a certain maturity level to understand that you must learn to eliminate your distractions.


Now lets expand on the questions above:
1. Raw Artistic Talent – You have to possess some raw talent. Talent that can then be refined and molded into the budding designer, artist, illustrator, or graphic artist that you want to be.
2. Are you really into the subject matter? Some students don’t really know what to expect entering design school. Some just decided to join design school because they knew they did not want to study engineering. They wanted to do something creative and creating designs on paper seemed to be a great alternative. There is a rude awakening when entering a design school. You suddenly realize that it is HARD work! Constantly drawing and practicing with feverish intensity. You have to get over failure after failure of bad sketches…only to be proud of one single sketch. You then have to re-assess whether this was the right path. ” I thought designing and drawing was supposed to be easy. Those videos I keep watching make it look so effortless!”
3. How much focused effort are you putting in every day? Just because you put in hours and hours of practice does not mean you will get results. You still need to have a goal in mind before getting into the mindset of practicing. Perhaps you want to nail down perspective for primitive shapes like boxes. Well…you have to practice several pages a day and keep working on your goal until you meet it. If you start thinking about “other” things while drawing, then you lose concentration and therefore loose sight of what your original goal was. Focus…and get the job done.
4. Are you setting weekly goals to accomplish? In addition to daily goals…they must be part of a bigger plan. The larger plan may take a couple years so you then have to break your goals down to months and weeks. Set your weekly schedule on what you would like to practice and work to complete it. If you combine elements from number 3 and focus your efforts, you are sure to come out a winner!
5. What are you willing to give up in your normal routine in order to accomplish your goals? I don’t know about some of you but I know that I had to stop watching all my favorite TV shows. There just isn’t enough hours during the day to watch TV, play video games, party with friends and get your work done. Something has gotta give. Only you will know what that is and only you can decide if extra activities are preventing you from reaching your goals. Don’t get me wrong…you have to have fun, just try to find the right balance to make it all work.
6. Am I going over and above the requirements? Want to know what makes the average person great? Going over and above the requirement! Doing extra work will not only accelerate your progress but also reinforce your love for the subject. When you get to a stage where you constantly draw and don’t care whether your sketches are good or bad, you are on the right track. It means your passion for the subject replaces the mindset of ”have to do it” to “want to do it.”
I’ll admit that it’s never easy looking at your bad drawings, but you have to be prepared to understand that it’s just that…a drawing. Try not to fall in love with it because theoretically, you should be cranking out several pages where you get better little by little.



Therefore , when you complete you sketches and start a new page, your other page is obsolete. You should be able to throw it away. Don’t get attached.
If you follow these principles, then your anxiety level will drop…and you may very well see the improvement and skill level that finally live up to your expectations.



Cheers!"
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Old September 19th, 2012, 08:42 PM   #115
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

How to file Copyright



More: http://mariabrophy.com/
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Old October 3rd, 2012, 07:38 PM   #116
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"If you show yourself, it's a risk.
You take the risk of being rejected.
If you have pretensions to being an artist,
of any kind, you have to take the risk
of people rejecting you,
and thinking your an asshole."


Roger Waters - Pink Floyd
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Old October 11th, 2012, 07:48 AM   #117
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Wendall Castle is a furniture maker/artist in upstate New York. These are his 10 adopted rules of thumb:

1. If you are in love with an idea you are no longer judge of its beauty or value.
2. It is difficult to see the whole picture when you are inside the frame.
3. After learning the tricks of the trade don't think you know the trade.
4. We hear and apprehend what we already know.
5.The dog that stays on the porch will find no bones.
6. Never state the problem to yourself in the same terms it was brought to you.
7. If it's offbeat or surprising it's probably useful.
8. If you do not expect the unexpected, you will not find it.
9. Don't get too serious.
10. If you hit the bullseye every time, the target is too near.

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Old October 11th, 2012, 04:23 PM   #118
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always gotten.
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Old October 20th, 2012, 09:38 PM   #119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unkl Ian View Post

THE ART OF SELF PROMOTION:

The Kustom Paint, Art, and the Airbrush Industry all have one thing in common, the need for self promotion at one level, or another. While self promotion may not necessarily make you a better artist, it will make your work more accessible by the public, and increase your networking abilities with other artists. Magazines, Galleries, and clientelle, all are similar in the respect that they want, and need artists. Whether it be for asthetic reasons, or business, the artist is the commodity, just as much as the work. Getting this commodity to the market should be the focus of any artist that deems his work worthy of being seen. Even if money is not of a consideration, (this is of course a hypothetical situation,..heheheh. ) networking, and promoting yourself, as well as your work is invaluable to the artists to promote self growth. Being constantly aware of your position, and the surrounding climate of the art field is a distinctly important technique in keeping a pulse on the industry itself. Also while you may feel that the spotlight is an open arena for critique, (both professional, and personal) this level of critique can be constructive in improving your work. I find that the constant challenge I meet everytime I teach a workshop, or give a demonstration is not just to entertain the crowd, but to show them something new. In short to give them their money's worth. This has less to do with ego, then it has to do with the importance of the constant critiques I am faced with on my final work. These critiques literally lite a fire under myself to keep up my standards, and to keep shooting for something new, and better in my own work. The danger of lack of publicity in ones art is only partially financial, the real hazard is in losing touch with your field of work, and missing out on the opportunity for self improvement. When I first began working in airbrush 20 years ago, and automotive a decade ago, I noticed that there where two distinctly different personalities in the industry. There where the hardworking painters, that cared little for publicity, and focused on production, and there were the more flamboyant painters, who also had very charismatic personalities, and used them to promote their work. Now there were quality artists in both categories, as well as those that were not so good,...this is a given. The one thing that I noticed was that the longevity of the artist was only partially due to the art. The publicity of the artist in conjunction with quality of art worked together to make the artist, and his work a complete entity. The publicity with quality work would open more doors for the artist increasing his sales venues, as well as his influence on and by the industry. Many of the production workers with little or no concern for publicity would burn-out, while the well-rounded artist was constantly being challenged by the constant critiques, accolades, and influences of other artists. To sum it up, you get what you put in. If you want money, and all your work is geared solely towards that with little concern for the industry, continuing education, or it's publicity, then that's what you will get. It's not about ego, nor money, both are an important consideration when dealing with any artists career. One persons ego is another persons reputation. If dealt with in balance, and not in excess, you will be successful, not just in the short run, but in the long run. Everybody likes to get the recognition they deserve, the trick is deserving it. The best thing is, that it is in every persons grasp. I love the art industry because you get back exactly what you put into it.


REACHING THE MEDIA:
One of the worst kept secrets in the industry is how to get peoples attention. I say this because all the information is out there to be had, but many people feel that they will fail before they even try. The tricks to getting this attention are usually as simple as just being persistent, here are a few techniques to try out when making your contacts.
There are currently two primary ways in which to represent yourself, and your work: Directly, and Indirectly. Since few of us actually have personal contact with someone in the industry, or the magazine editors, and gallery owners, the indirect approach is the most practical. There are 3 ways in which to contact these individuals, and nearly everybody has access to them. Phone, E-mail, and Snail-Mail. I assume everybody reading this has access to E-Mail. No one of these is more important then the others, but all should be used equally. I will use E-mail to set up a contact, use the phone to verify, and follow up the initial E-mail, then use standard postage for sending photos, portfolios, or work transparencies. Since the latter is the most costly per exchange, I reserve it for when I am sure I've got a contact at the other end with a heart-beat. If somebody does not return your phone calls, or E-mail it is a given that they will also ignore your letters, and packages of costly transparencies. I mentioned the term "costly" to refer to transparencies. But if you have ever mass produced a working portfolio to send out to prospective clients, magazines, or galleries, then you know it takes a big bite out of your budget sending them to people that may not be interested. Verify this interest with a followup to your initial contact. Another form of contacts are artists forums, and internet web-rings. While these are relatively new, I see them as being the future of artists networking, and a necessity for the artist that wants his work see. Another place that JW recently showed me is findmeanartist.com Since these networking systems are either none, or nil on the cost, I highly recommend getting involved with as many as possible.
If you are interested in contacting a magazine, I always recommend a cold call to determine what their system is for accepting, and putting on file artists works. You will usually find this contact phone number on the index, or editorial page of the magazine. For example, the phone number contact for Autographics Magazine is (800) 669-0424, contact with the editor is Dirk Vinlove at dvinlove@nbm.com--This is all the information you need to establish your initial contact, and you will find it in whichever magazine you wish to contact. It is important to realize that the magazines need the artists more then the artists need the magazines, and because of this they are very interested in finding the new faces, and new look of artwork to come in the industry. Try and show your most unique pieces, a portfolio of work that looks like a current contributors work will be appreciated, but it will not stand out as much as something completely different. Entering a "readers gallery", "readers rides", or magazine contest is another good way to get the attention of a magazine, no matter what title you are looking at getting into. Remember persistence is the key. I'm not talking about being obnoxious, or becoming a stalker, just be sure that you can get the people working at the mag to assign a voice, and personal reference to the artwork that they receive. Remember, you are one of thousands to contribute, any little thing to make you, and your work standout, is a benefit. As a positive note, about 90% of the people that mail in their work do not follow up their initial contact, so if you do, the persistence will pay off.
Galleries can be a bit more elusive, and since their primary focus is selling your work, and making money for you, as well as themselves, they tend to be a bit more picky. Can't blame them really, but it doesn't mean you can't send in your work. Just be sure no matter what you send, or what portfolio you put together, make sure it is your best work. Whether it be for magazines, or galleries, it is a general rule that quality will win out over quantity every time!! With galleries, I suggest getting to know the gallerys personally. If a gallery does not reflect your style, not only will they probably not be interested, but they probably wouldn't be the best at selling, and representing your work anyway. I recommend getting involved with group shows. A group show is usually a theme show where certain artists are invited, or selected to contribute one or two pieces in a large forum of other artists. Not only are they pretty fun, but they are great ways to network with other artists, get great critiques from professional critics, as well as your fellow gallery contributors. Plus,...you don't have to come up with 20+ pieces of work for the show, and if the show does badly, it's not necessarily your fault, and if it's a success,...you can feel what you like,..heheheh. Remember if you get accepted for a gallery show, and contracts will be signed. There is nothing worse then making it in the door, to only drop the ball by missing a deadline. Be sure that you don't bite off more then you can chew in the excitement of the moment.

PHOTOGRAPHING, AND REPRESENTING YOUR WORK:


All the best contacts in the world can't help if your notes can't be read, and the pictures are not print quality. Because of this, it is important to ensure the quality of the work that you send, whether it be a magazine, gallery, or client. The easiest method to guarantee this quality would be to hire your own professional photographer, and publicist, but if you're like me, this is an expense that is not too practical. This leaves the photos, and info up to you. The good part is, if your editorial skills are not up to snuff, the magazines have their own fleet of copy editors and art directors, waiting to turn your notes into Shakespeare. The first thing I'm going to focus on is photography:
While digital cameras are the latest craze, and most likely will be the medium of choice in the near future, the majority of magazines still work from transparencies, mostly 35 mm. I recommend using a digital format to submit work for approval,(cost is a lot less then slide duplicates) but since the magazines still do the art-directing, and scans from 35mm, you will need to get used to taking these for future articles, or feature prints. If you've ever taken a photograph before, you will be relieved to know that it is no different then taking a slide/photo. The only real difference is the film. I recommend using FUJI Provia 100 speed film. This is the film of choice by the professionals, and gives the best color representation I've seen. FUJI Sensia is good too, I just think the Provia has better color. I normally try and find 36 exposure over 24 since in the long run you get more slides for your buck after developing. The reason I recommend 100 speed is not necessarily because of light conditions, we will discuss that later, but because the higher speed films also have a tendency of being a bit more grainy. (Plus your artwork should not be moving around, so there should be no need for fast film,...heheh) A program/manual camera is preferable over a point & shoot, but not mandatory. I actually got a shot that was used for a cover photo using a little automatic with 35 mm. What is important is the use of a tri-pod, especially for a tech article. Besides the tripod keeping your camera steady for the shot, it also keeps the frame in reference, and angle of photo consistent.
When photographing stills of work, a black backdrop, or piece of carpet is the best way to make your work stand out, with little background interference. The black background will also make it easier to crop the shots later, if need be. I like to work outside if the weather permits with the sun at either 9, or 3, but never 12. Overheard sun is a little nasty for hotspots on automotive, and while there are better shadows, it is a little harsh. I personally love a little overcast, or a strategic cloud overhead. Acts as a nice filter to get rid of the glare. Since none of us can predict the weather, inside studio shots are often the norm, and that requires a little lighting.
You can purchase expensive photo lights, but that gets back to the problem of spending money. I discovered, quite by accident, that by combining overhead fluorescent, (often in most shops, and offices anyway) along with tungsten, or preferably halogen spots can give you a good balance between yellow, and blue. If you want to get a little tricky, set up the lights that you have, (halogens, tungsten, mercury, sodium, cigarette lighters,...mood candles,..whatever), then shoot a couple of shots moving the lights around, trying different F-stops, and shutter speeds on your cameras to bracket the shots. (For most of us, set the camera on Program, or the little green "A" and start shooting.! It would take a separate article just to scratch the surface on camera settings, and I'm not the best expert on that anyway.) After developing, take the slides to your local photo shop, and ask what type of filter would be best for the lighting that you used. Often times the filter is much less then the cost of new lights,...and most artists and kustom painters have quite a few lights laying around the studio.
When photographing a how-to, I actually use a timer on the camera to take the shots: focusing on the area to be shot, then stepping into the picture to pose for the shot. This is the easiest, since sometimes I have no one around to help with the shot. It takes a little getting used to imagining yourself in the shot, but try and use reference images in the background to help eliminate the possibility of cutting off your head. (Remember I said to use a black background for stills,...it is equally important to have a background set when shooting a tech. The more information you can include in a tech photo, the better. )While the subject matter your painting is the focus of the article, you should still include photos of yourself working on the element to help direct what area you worked on in each shot, and to give scale to the work itself. There is nothing more boring then a tech article with nobody in it. Alternate your close-ups with wide angle shots, to help the reader see the over all progress of the piece, yet still see your detail. Since I am right-handed, I prefer to have the camera over, and above my left shoulder for the shots, at about a 30-45 degree angle to the work. I have a spotlight slightly behind and above the camera to eliminate any shadows I may cast, yet not cast any from the camera and tripod. I also use the flash, in fill-in mode to eliminate any other shadows, and to really punch out the work I'm working on. This is why I have the camera at an angle, to prevent the flash from bouncing back into the lens. If you have a low ceiling, you can also accomplish this by bouncing the flash. A light meter can help at this point, but usually that initial slide role you took to establish the quality of light will give you time to experiment with the flash angles, and camera angles. (Just be sure to make notes as to what you did in each frame of your practice role,...this will save confusion later.!!) Since I use the camera's flash I keep the camera within 15 feet of the image. Not to close though, I also like to use a telephoto lens and keep the camera a minimum of 6 feet away, and zoom in on details. This eliminates the need to move the tripod, and your lighting when you go for full frame shots. Whew! Hope I didn't inundate, and confuse any of you. If I did, feel free to drop me an E-mail, and I can help clear up anything that I muddied.
One thing that has radically changed in the industry since I first wrote this piece, is the digital photography being used. As you noted above, while I recommended the format, the magazines were still not using it, at least not for practical application. (I originally wrote this in the mid 90's) Since then, and currently in 2003 the mags have gone nuts for digital. You just have to be sure to give them enough resolution so they can use it. The DPI requirements differ from mag to mag, you need to ask to make sure. I will say that the minimum camera size you can successfully work is 5 megapixel. This will give you enough leeway, you should be able to deliver quality shots on a regular basis to the magazines. The small point and shoots are fine, but I would lean towards the ones with the quality lens. My Sony Cybershot is 5 megapixel, and has the new Carl Zies lens set up. Nikon also makes an excellent, and affordable camera with good quality lens that is also 5 megapixel. Probably the best affordable highend with removeable lens would be the new EOS digital by Cannon. Whichever one you get, just remember, unlike the older camera setups, your digital will be sort of like your home computer. Which means don't be depressed, when you see new, and better ones popping up every 6 months to a year. One year after I got my Sony, Sony came up with an 8 megapixel,....go figure. I'll probably wait until it is a 10, and has removable lens before I turn it into the hobby camera, and get the new bad boy for my article work. Equipment is important, but be sure you are not one of those types that has the best equipment, but is broke,..kind of defeats the purpose. heheheheh.

THE TEXT, AND NECESSARY BIOS:
If writing text for a tech article, the information is very necessary, but most importantly is your bio. Your bio is the part of your presentation that describes and represents you when you are not there in person. It should reflect yourself, as well as your work. The standard Bio should include a brief history of your art, and any specifics you think are necessary. The length of time airbrushing, or painting, is often put in, but in the end it is really up to you. A client list is nice, and I personally like to read about what tools, materials, and medium that the artist prefers to work with. Besides a Bio piece on yourself, it is also quite common to include a descriptive bio of each of your submitted piece. (ie: materials used, artwork size, date of completion, and even price if the piece is for gallery consideration. ) By the way, if the piece is for Gallery consideration, you must remember that the gallery will assign it's own price as well, the price you are submitting, is what you want out of the work. Don't be surprised if the gallery doubles your asking price, this is quite common, and shouldn't really matter, if you were happy with the price you quoted. Don't forget: Gallery clientele realize this, and don't have a problem. Often times the clients will approach you privately to later commission prices. If you have no agent, then you can negotiate on future work. Be careful not to try and sell your pieces behind the gallerys back. This is a gallery/ethics no-no. After all the gallery did spend the money on advertising, display space, mailers, and opening, and closing parties,.....they do deserve their cut.
As for the text for a how-to, or feature: Write the best you can. Most of us are literate, and many editors are quite adept at deciphering the work that comes in. What is important, is if you work is going to be edited for content, as well as quality, then you should make a point to request a final proof before the text goes to print. This will eliminate any future misprints, or misquotes. I have never come across a professional editor anywhere that had a problem with this, you just need to make sure that they know you want it. When writing, my best advice is to write as you speak. If you read your work aloud and it sounds bizarre or dry, then try and smooth it out. Often times a friend proof-reading, or listening can save a lot of frustrating re-writes. If you write as you speak, then you will not only convey your words but your personality as well, which is very important for the readers to make a connection with you, and not just your work. While hand-written notes will work, I'm again going to assume that if you are reading this, you have access to a computer with word-processor capabilities,....and of course the blessed Spell-Check! Making your work look as professional as possible, will be rewarded by you being treated as a fellow professional.

THE ART OF THE FOLLOW UP:
The art of the follow up is literally that. The only reason I gave it a separate category is to remind you all of the importance of following up your contacts with either phone-calls, E-mails, Snail-Mails, or skywriting,...heck whatever works. If they don't return a call right away, don't take it personally,....if they personally know you, and don't call you back,...then you can get mad. Realize that you are one of thousands that send in their work, and letters. In this industry it is often the squeaky wheel that gets the attention, so go ahead and squeak. Heck all they can say is no. I pretty much got ignored for the better part of a year, it didn't stop me, and it shouldn't stop you. Your artwork, portfolios, and transparencies are valuable commodities. You should make every effort to be sure that they are at least looked at, otherwise, it was just a waste of time. I'm not talking about being obnoxious, just persistent.
Now if you want to get your transparencies, or any of your sent work returned after being sent, never assume that the company will do this out of the kindness of their heart. The postage is not necessarily the issue, it is the entire chain of work needed to get those slides returned. I personally never send one-of-a-kind pieces, and always include a self-addressed stamped package along with the work, so that it can be returned with as much ease as possible. I also recommend including a separate letter, or note requesting all work to be returned. If the company advertises that they keep all submittals, don't be upset, this is not necessarily because they are lazy, but often times they wish to keep works on file for future reference. In this case, be sure to send expendable items, and have copies of all your transparencies sent. I have gotten many jobs from magazines, and galleries that have kept my work on file. Consider it a compliment if they want to file your work.

THE REALITY OF IT ALL:
To sum up this novel: Here are the tools, the rest is up to you. It is a basic fact of the industry that promotion is important, and self promotion, while requiring some work, is the most satisfying, and truly representative of the artist. As I've said before in my posts, and in this letter, nothing is guaranteed, but hey, if I could do it, there is no reason that anybody else out there cannot. While it is true that the magazine, and fine art/gallery industry are wrought by politics, the same can be said for every other aspect of mankind. Whenever you have two differing viewpoints, you will have politics. This is fine if you are a politician, but as an artist, I value my art, the field of art that I consider a home, and the friends, and fellow artists along the way as being the only truly important things. The politics were just there along the way, and were dealt with. If you want something, and it is worth fighting for, it will be worth more then anything that is given freely. Try and view any pitfalls, and criticisms along the way as necessary, and character building, and you, and your art will be better for it. The important thing is try. Good luck, and keep on painting.
Paint to live, live to paint.


Craig Frazer
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Old October 31st, 2012, 08:30 PM   #120
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

http://drewbrophy.com/for-all-artist...amryn-manheim/

In May of 2009 Camryn Manheim, a professional actress (star of “The Practice”), gave a commencement address to students at College of the Arts.
Her speech inspired artists of all kinds, so much so that an outline of her speech has been circulated online.
(I don’t know where this outline originally came from. If you know, please tell me and I’ll give proper credit.)
Camryn shares a philosophy that has enabled her to find success and happiness in her art. I hope you enjoy it:


“TO ALL ARTISTS” by Camryn Manheim
1. Don’t take “No” for an answer (know what you want, and look for another way to get it.)

2. It’s good to Have A Plan (You can only get to a destination if you have a route to follow.)

3. Dream Big, but set realist goals (Design steps toward your Big Goal with smaller ones that you can actually measure and accomplish).

4. Don’t confuse your life with your work (don’t spend all your time at it, don’t equate your successes or rejections in work with your personality , avoid being emotionally overwhelmed by your “to-do” list).

5 Pay it forward (Serve your community: “You make a living by what you get, you make a life by what you give.”)

6. Break some rules once in awhile (this might be precisely the time to dosomething that’s never been done before—then you’ll stand out from the competition: but by all means, use your head!)

7. See the Big Picture: your 20’s were designed for you to struggle a little.
(Some mistakes will have to be made so you’ll know what you don’t want!)

8. You ALWAYS have a choice, re. your attitude: live in a state of grace. Be optimistic, determined and forgiving.

ENGAGE IN MEANINGFUL , FULFILLING WORK: MAKE A DIFFERENCE!
YOUR GIFTS CAN CHANGE THE WAY WE LIVE:

ART IS THE WAY MANKIND CONNECTS WITH ITS PAST, ITS PRESENT , AND ITS FUTURE.
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Old November 10th, 2012, 07:46 PM   #121
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

Drew Brophy on authenticity in art and life
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Old November 27th, 2012, 07:02 PM   #122
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

"Get off your ass, and make it happen now;
because otherwise, it's not going to happen."

Captain Robert - Abney Park
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Old November 28th, 2012, 07:19 PM   #123
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

For those appathetic toward accomplishing anything. "There's no time like some other time." And the ever popular, "If at first you don't succeed, fail, it's a lot easier...."
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Old November 28th, 2012, 08:29 PM   #124
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

The most powerful 10 words in the English language.
...
...
Easy to say.
...
All very easy to spell! .
....
"If it is to be it is up to me."
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Old November 30th, 2012, 08:52 AM   #125
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

"
The Creative Element

There’s always a certain type that wants to know “how long did it take you to make that”, or some variation on the theme….because to most folks time equals money only. But as an artist or a craftsman, those people aren’t necessarily your target. I create pieces that are one of a kind, unique. There is a creative element that isn’t tangible in an accountant’s ledger, an element that you can’t equate to seconds, minutes, hours, or days. The discerning collector, the thoughtful consumer WANTS that element, is willing to pay for that element, and that’s who I’m going after."


Josh Welton
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