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Old December 5th, 2014, 06:56 PM   #151
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Default Re: Tools for Creativity

"Chop wood, carry water, clean the shop for a few years. And if you don't complain, we might let you pick up a tool and lend a hand. So if you really want to be a journeyman and a master craftsman follow these simple rules.

Suck it up.Work really hard. Learn to love your work. Be proud to let it define you .You wont be sorry."
That's one of the main reasons the trades are desperate for new blood: no one today wants to start at the bottom and work their way up...

Excellent article. As a journeyman auto body repairer, I can fully appreciate where the writer comes from.
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Old December 6th, 2014, 01:30 PM   #152
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John Wooden: The difference between winning and succeeding
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Old December 16th, 2014, 11:58 AM   #153
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Aaron Draplin: designing logos

Aaron Draplin: MIA sesson

Aaron Draplin: little leagues

Aaron Draplin: 50 point plan


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Old December 17th, 2014, 03:07 PM   #154
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The science of persuasion.
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Old December 17th, 2014, 07:46 PM   #155
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Starting an apparel line.

Starting Your Own Apparel Line – What You Need to Know
by
Marshall Atkinson

"The one thing that all t-shirt print shops around the globe share is that at least once a week, there’s a random person strolling into the office with “the greatest idea ever” for starting their own apparel line. Usually they haven’t put much thought into it at all, and they are just armed with some scribbles for an idea and a lot of nervous energy as the mountain of questions start. Just about every one of these folks will fail at their new “business”, and are usually stuck with cases of shirts in their living room that even their grandmother won’t want.
Even if they had a great idea, they are doomed from the start as they didn’t do some basic homework first to understand what they were getting into. If there is one notion you want to understand completely before you leap off the high diving board, and that is how big and deep the pool underneath will be. Don’t just launch yourself and hope that you will make it.
Below are the 9 tips that can set you up for a better chance of success. Starting your own apparel brand from your kitchen table or work break room with your friends? Use these to prepare, develop and position the idea for success.


Write a real business plan. Before you spend any money with a screen-printer, designer or trademark attorney, do your homework first and write a business plan. This is going to involve researching the industry from the supply chain, to distribution, to how you are going to market your idea. Who is your competition? What cost factors influence manufacturing your line? Can you design your own images, and if not, what does a great designer cost? How are you going to sell your shirts? Usually it’s either to a store or on a website. What are the challenges in selling on both of those platforms? How are you going to overcome them?


Understand your production costs. Printing a t-shirt sounds very simple on the face of it. However, it can get complex quickly the more locations and ink colors that are added to the design. Make sure you talk to a few screen-printers and understand their cost structure before you start designing. Get written price lists that you can use. Most apparel lines sell for the same price, regardless if they are on a website or hanging on a rack in a store. There’s a big difference in cost though between a one color full front and a six color full front design. This means that you’ll make less money per shirt if you use more ink colors. The more print locations and ink colors you add to your shirt design, the more it will cost to produce. This is critical information to have before you start designing your apparel line, as you need to work out the cost structure before you develop your creative ideas.


Success is 50/50. The best apparel lines are very choosy about what garment to use for their lines. Color, style, cut, fit, hand are all critical factors. Half of the buying decision for the consumer is based on the shirt. Let’s face it, how many times have you liked a particular shirt only to not buy it because it was in the wrong color, or you didn’t like the style or cut of the shirt? Maybe you loved the design, but just wished it came in other choices. The most popular t-shirt colors used are black, white, and some sort of gray (ash, light steel, oxford, charcoal, etc.)…in that order. These shirt colors look good on anybody and are the basic lowest common denominator for color choices. Once you start throwing other colors into the mix, then there usually is a reason behind that color selection. It’s a team color, or color associated with the theme of the design. Make sure you pair your shirt design with an appropriate shirt color and style. Know, like the back of your hand, what your target demographic prefers. Absolutely don’t choose what you like, but rather what your customers like. There sometimes is a huge difference.

Design, it’s crucial.
Unless you are a good designer, it’s vitally important that you spend some time (and money) choosing the best designer for needs. Yes, your next door neighbor kid just finished one semester of design school so he can probably do it…but is that really the best choice for your needs? Don’t cheap out. Although you may not know them personally, there are many extremely skilled and creative apparel designers that can help you. There is a big difference between someone that can design a t-shirt, and someone that can design a t-shirt that can make someone walk across a store, grab a shirt off the rack and scream “I gotta have this!” Are you sure you want to go with the “save a buck” plan?

Don’t rip-off others.
Thinking of taking someone else’s logo or idea and changing it so you can sell it as your own? That’s not only unethical and illegal, but just plain lazy. I’m sure if you scour the internet long enough you can find tons of comments about how changing someone’s logo or art 20% or whatever, constitutes that it’s enough to get by legally. However, that isn’t going to stop someone from suing you. What is twenty percent of an image anyway? My take on it has been to always try to shoot for the high road and just design something unique. If you don’t have something unique to present to the market, then it’s time to go back to the drawing board until you do. Having the balls to rework someone else’s idea into your own doesn’t make you a good business-person; it just makes you a scumbag.

Should you change out the neck labels?
The answer is yes, definitely. Of all the lines that make it, the neck tags are always removed and something else is sewn, heat pressed or printed to replace them. This makes your idea appear to be bigger than it actually may be, and lends gravitas to your idea. It’s not really that expensive, and if you add in a website to the information, can even be good marketing to your endeavor. Starting out, using heat press transfer labels is going to be the most economical method, as these can be manufactured by the same printer that is helping with the rest of the order. When making them, print up a few sheets more than you need and just keep them ready. Once orders start rolling in you can move to using woven labels later.

Get some samples printed & pay for them.
Trying to test out your line or selling it to shops? Working with your printer, print sell samples and use these to gain traction for your line. Absolutely pay for these, and don’t try to work the price down to the printer with the plea “Can you help on the price? This line is going to be huge?” Actually, we hear this at least once a week, and honestly, it’s not going to be huge. There is a tremendous amount of effort, and a little bit of luck, that goes into making your idea work and getting it into stores. Samples are basically prototypes, and there is going to be some developmental costs with these. Remember, this is a business. Work your sample costs into your business plan.

Remember, your printer wants the print business.
When showing the idea for the first time, most people say “What do you think?” Every printer out there is going to say, “Hey that’s great, let’s get going.” A few may start talking about how talented their art department is, which always is code for: “Your art sucks, maybe we can help.” If you really want an honest opinion about your print line, find people that don’t know you. Nobody wants to disappoint their friend, or make a potential customer angry. Before you print a bunch of shirts that might not sell, show a mock up to as many people as you can. The fancy term for this is called a market survey. Companies use these to gauge interest and tweak products before releasing them into the marketplace.

Treat your supply chain right.
Your lifelines for success are the people and companies that are helping you. The best advice I can give you is to remember to pay them. People don’t work for free, and you can’t cash promises. Want to be a success? Make sure you are compensating the ones that are going to get you to the finish line. This includes your design team, who usually gets stiffed.
People strike gold all the time from their kitchen table, building up a side business into a lucrative apparel line. A gazillion others, crash and burn for the same amount of reasons. If you are serious about starting your own line, and not just consigned to sell twenty shirts to your beer swilling buddies; then you should treat the venture like any other business start-up and think it through. Do your homework and understand everything before you start spending any money. Although there is no guarantee for success, the ones that have laid a firm foundation generally are the ones that come out ahead in the end."
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Old December 29th, 2014, 11:21 AM   #156
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Not just automotive media:


http://stickydiljoe.com/2014/12/29/a...media-is-dead/

Automotive media is dead.


"If this image represents the template that you use every day on your respective Instagram account(s), congratulations for being the lowest common denominator. You have done nothing but continue to use the hard work of others for personal gain and attempt to peddle unoriginal goods to unsuspecting automotive enthusiasts.

There are people who have a real passion to create content for the world and who pay for their own camera equipment, travel using their own expenses, and spend hours after to publish their work. You do not have that passion. You are thieves and leeches who think that taking advantage of people for personal gain is okay. And those of you who support these accounts are just as bad as the ones who created them. Print is dying at a rapid rate because you do not support the creators. Just as fast as print is dying is the inspiration of those who have the talent to create. Why put in the time when it takes a few seconds for people to screenshot what took hours to create? You are a detriment to this community because you do not understand. You not only lack passion, you have no understanding of what it takes to work hard…


“Me” culture is destroying automotive media. You think it is okay to use someone else’s content because someone will “tag” them later. You justify it by putting “tag owner” and/or “tag photographer” followed by “Follow Me”. Your account is a fallacy. No one ever said you couldn’t share, but share with credit to the creators. You will never understand how much work it takes to make something if you don’t put in the time to try it. Pick up a camera, use the camera that you have on your own smart phone. Create something. Stop taking. If you follow these pages, stop following these people because you are no better than them. If your excuse is “I just want to see cool cars”, then you are a fool. You are just like the thieves you try to protect your car from everyday. They too care little about your hard work, your passion, and your time…


The Internet and social media has provided us with a valuable resource to share photos, words, and other forms of media with the rest of the world. Contribute to it. Stop taking from others.
What if you worked 40+ hours a week and someone takes your paycheck every two weeks and cashes it? …and they think it is okay as long as someone tells someone else that you put in the work?… What if you put all your money into building your car and when you finish it, someone else is driving it and not necessarily telling everyone that it is their car, but doesn’t mind if people believe that it is their’s? (Lie by omission)
…and they think it is okay as long as someone tells someone else that you built it?…


What if you went to work to put food on the table for your kids to eat and someone comes and eats it without your consent?… …and you tell your kids that they can go hungry because someone else tells them that you tried to feed them?…
Life doesn’t work that way. Stop thinking that it is right for you to take so you can indulge yourself.
Your number of followers doesn’t mean anything.

Nobody wants your basic-ass decals to promote your shitty account. No one gives a shit about following your other accounts and your lame ass friends’ accounts.


If you own one of these accounts because you’re out for some sort of imaginary fame or to make a name for yourself by copying and pasting,
fuck you and what you’re about.
And fuck your crew too. Follow that.

Automotive media is dead because you don’t understand how to use the camera function on your own phone. Educate yourself. Go out and earn something for once."
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Old January 1st, 2015, 08:32 PM   #157
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The Death of the Artist—and the Birth of the Creative Entrepreneur
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Old January 1st, 2015, 08:34 PM   #158
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The Artist Endures
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Old January 1st, 2015, 08:44 PM   #159
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Great article. Being an artist is getting harder and harder. Pinterest, Etsy and all the art sites make it more difficult to be original. One thing that makes a artist known is that they are the first to do something OR they take something to a different level.
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Old January 1st, 2015, 09:22 PM   #160
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“Creativity is more than just being different.
Anybody can plan weird; that’s easy.
What’s hard is to be as simple as Bach.
Making the simple, awesomely simple, that’s creativity”
– Charles Mingus
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Old January 2nd, 2015, 01:36 PM   #161
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Old January 2nd, 2015, 01:40 PM   #162
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http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/st...-im-slideshare
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Old January 2nd, 2015, 05:49 PM   #163
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Old January 2nd, 2015, 05:53 PM   #164
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Old January 3rd, 2015, 06:47 AM   #165
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Yep... it's there in the story posted by Unkl Ian -

Steve Jobs' quote "It’s more fun to be a pirate than to join the navy."

I like that one.
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Old January 4th, 2015, 06:55 PM   #166
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Henry Rollins:

Using Anger As Fuel 1/3
Joining Black Flag 2/3
Alcohol, Drugs and His Reagan Era Tattoos 3/3
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Old January 4th, 2015, 09:06 PM   #167
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Will Terry:
How to price your work
6 Business Tips
Protect My Artwork From Theft
Portfolio
Marketing
Rise UP !
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Old January 5th, 2015, 06:12 PM   #168
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unkl Ian View Post
Will Terry:
Artist block

"Our vision develops much faster than our ability"





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Old January 5th, 2015, 07:13 PM   #169
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Work for free ?

More work for free ?

Free ?

OPRAH wants a freebie ?

GOOGLE wants a freebie ?

Equal wants a freebie ?

When people work for free, who pays ?

Things to never ask an artist
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Old January 5th, 2015, 07:49 PM   #170
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Bruce Lee
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Old January 6th, 2015, 01:05 PM   #171
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Mike Monteiro:


How Designers Destroyed the World

F*ck You, Pay Me
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Old January 7th, 2015, 04:41 AM   #172
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unkl Ian View Post
Snipped Links that equal "Free labor"
That right there is the problem with too many people. They want it without paying for it. It's sad that anyone has ZERO respect for another's work, and have the audacity to even suggest these people work for free. Doing any kind of work for free usually is work you PAY to do, in some form or another.

HOWEVER... it is incumbent on the individual to make sure they get paid to work. It's pretty much the same as working at any job and being UNDER paid. If you don't demand the compensation, there will be little or none.

I could give so many examples of this same attitude... These are extremely well illustrated.
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Old January 7th, 2015, 09:07 AM   #173
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCOTTRODS View Post
That right there is the problem with too many people. They want it without paying for it. It's sad that anyone has ZERO respect for another's work, and have the audacity to even suggest these people work for free. Doing any kind of work for free usually is work you PAY to do, in some form or another.

HOWEVER... it is incumbent on the individual to make sure they get paid to work. It's pretty much the same as working at any job and being UNDER paid. If you don't demand the compensation, there will be little or none.

I could give so many examples of this same attitude... These are extremely well illustrated.
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Old January 7th, 2015, 10:34 AM   #174
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Exactly...
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Old January 7th, 2015, 10:44 AM   #175
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Mike Rowe on following your passion:

http://yellowhammernews.com/faithand...we-dirty-jobs/

Mike Rowe of “Dirty Jobs” has made a habit of going viral on the Internet by responding to fan questions, like the time a fan told him to prove he was the real-deal and wasn’t living a posh celebrity lifestyle and Rowe responded by giving a photo-tour of his apartment.
On Tuesday it was Stephen Adams of Auburn, Alabama who wrote in questioning a now famous speech in which Rowe said “follow your passion” was the worst advice he’d ever received.
“Hi, Mike. Let me begin by saying that I love what you and your foundation are attempting to do,” Adams wrote. “However, I’m confused by your directive to NOT “follow your passion.” I think it can be safely argued that if no one followed their passion, companies like Apple, Microsoft, Dow, and many more wouldn’t exist. If no one follows their passion, who innovates? Who founds companies that provide jobs for the outstanding workers that your foundation aims to help?”
Rowe’s complete response can be found below:
Hi Stephen
A few years ago, I did a special called “The Dirty Truth.” In it, I challenged the conventional wisdom of popular platitudes by offering “dirtier,” more individualistic alternatives. For my inspiration, I looked to those hackneyed bromides that hang on the walls of corporate America. The ones that extoll passersby to live up to their potential by “dreaming bigger,” “working smarter,” and being a better “team player.” In that context, I first saw “Follow Your Passion” displayed in the conference room of a telemarketing firm that employed me thirty years ago. The words appeared next to an image of a rainbow, arcing gently over a waterfall and disappearing into a field of butterflies. Thinking of it now still makes me throw up in my mouth.
Like all bad advice, “Follow Your Passion” is routinely dispensed as though it’s wisdom were both incontrovertible and equally applicable to all. It’s not. Just because you’re passionate about something doesn’t mean you won’t suck at it. And just because you’re determined to improve doesn’t mean that you will. Does that mean you shouldn’t pursue a thing you’re passionate about?” Of course not. The question is, for how long, and to what end?
When it comes to earning a living and being a productive member of society – I don’t think people should limit their options to those vocations they feel passionate towards. I met a lot of people on Dirty Jobs who really loved their work. But very few of them dreamed of having the career they ultimately chose. I remember a very successful septic tank cleaner who told me his secret of success. “I looked around to see where everyone else was headed, and then I went the opposite way,” he said. “Then I got good at my work. Then I found a way to love it. Then I got rich.”
Every time I watch The Oscars, I cringe when some famous movie star – trophy in hand – starts to deconstruct the secret to happiness. It’s always the same thing, and I can never hit “mute” fast enough to escape the inevitable cliches. “Don’t give up on your dreams kids, no matter what.” “Don’t let anyone tell you that you don’t have what it takes.” And of course, “Always follow your passion!”
Today, we have millions looking for work, and millions of good jobs unfilled because people are simply not passionate about pursuing those particular opportunities. Do we really need Lady GaGa telling our kids that happiness and success can be theirs if only they follow their passion?
There are many examples – including those you mention – of passionate people with big dreams who stayed the course, worked hard, overcame adversity, and changed the world though sheer pluck and determination. We love stories that begin with a dream, and culminate when that dream comes true. And to your question, we would surely be worse off without the likes of Bill Gates and Thomas Edison and all the other innovators and Captains of Industry. But from my perspective, I don’t see a shortage of people who are willing to dream big. I see people struggling because their reach has exceeded their grasp.
I’m fascinated by the beginning of American Idol. Every year, thousands of aspiring pop-stars show up with great expectations, only to learn that they don’t have anything close to the skills they thought they did. What’s amazing to me, isn’t their lack of talent – it’s their lack of awareness, and the resulting shock of being rejected. How is it that so many people are so blind to their own limitations? How did these peope get the impression they could sing in the first place? Then again, is their incredulity really so different than the surprise of a college graduate who learns on his first interview that his double major in Medieval Studies and French Literature doesn’t guarantee him the job he expected? In a world where everyone gets a trophy, encouragement trumps honesty, and realistic expectations go out the window.
When I was 16, I wanted to follow in my grandfathers footsteps. I wanted to be a tradesman. I wanted to build things, and fix things, and make things with my own two hands. This was my passion, and I followed it for years. I took all the shop classes at school, and did all I could to absorb the knowledge and skill that came so easily to my granddad. Unfortunately, the handy gene skipped over me, and I became frustrated. But I remained determined to do whatever it took to become a tradesman.
One day, I brought home a sconce from woodshop that looked like a paramecium, and after a heavy sigh, my grandfather told me the truth. He explained that my life would be a lot more satisfying and productive if I got myself a different kind of toolbox. This was almost certainly the best advice I’ve ever received, but at the time, it was crushing. It felt contradictory to everything I knew about persistence, and the importance of “staying the course.” It felt like quitting. But here’s the “dirty truth,” Stephen. “Staying the course” only makes sense if you’re headed in a sensible direction. Because passion and persistence – while most often associated with success – are also essential ingredients of futility.
That’s why I would never advise anyone to “follow their passion” until I understand who they are, what they want, and why they want it. Even then, I’d be cautious. Passion is too important to be without, but too fickle to be guided by. Which is why I’m more inclined to say, “Don’t Follow Your Passion, But Always Bring it With You.”
Carry On
Mike
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